#Psychology_mags In a Different Key: The Story of Autism by John Donvan The Most…

#Psychology_mags

In a Different Key: The Story of Autism by John Donvan
The Most Human Human: What Talking with Computers Teaches Us About What It Means to Be Alive by Brian Christian
Jon Elster, “Explaining Social Behavior: More Nuts and Bolts for the Social Sciences (2nd edition)”
Manoush Zomorodi, “Bored and Brilliant: How Spacing Out Can Unlock Your Most Productive and Creative Self”
Understanding Human Nature : The Psychology of Personality

?In a Different Key: The Story of Autism by John Donvan

English | January 19th, 2016 | ASIN: B012UTQ5NO, ISBN: 0241958172, | 688 pages | AZW3 | 3.15 MB

Nearly seventy-five years ago, Donald Triplett of Forest, Mississippi, became the first child diagnosed with autism. Beginning with his family’s odyssey, In a Different Key tells the extraordinary story of this often misunderstood condition, and of the civil rights battles waged by the families of those who have it.
Unfolding over decades, it is a beautifully rendered history of ordinary people determined to secure a place in the world for those with autism—by liberating children from dank institutions, campaigning for their right to go to school, challenging expert opinion on what it means to have autism, and persuading society to accept those who are different.
It is the story of women like Ruth Sullivan, who rebelled against a medical establishment that blamed cold and rejecting “refrigerator mothers” for causing autism; and of fathers who pushed scientists to dig harder for treatments. Many others played starring roles too: doctors like Leo Kanner, who pioneered our understanding of autism; lawyers like Tom Gilhool, who took the families’ battle for education to the courtroom; scientists who sparred over how to treat autism; and those with autism, like Temple Grandin, Alex Plank, and Ari Ne’eman, who explained their inner worlds and championed the philosophy of neurodiversity.
This is also a story of fierce controversies—from the question of whether there is truly an autism “epidemic,” and whether vaccines played a part in it; to scandals involving “facilitated communication,” one of many treatments that have proved to be blind alleys; to stark disagreements about whether scientists should pursue a cure for autism. There are dark turns too: we learn about experimenters feeding LSD to children with autism, or shocking them with electricity to change their behavior; and the authors reveal compelling evidence that Hans Asperger, discoverer of the syndrome named after him, participated in the Nazi program that consigned disabled children to death.
By turns intimate and panoramic, In a Different Key takes us on a journey from an era when families were shamed and children were condemned to institutions to one in which a cadre of people with autism push not simply for inclusion, but for a new understanding of autism: as difference rather than disability.

?The Most Human Human: What Talking with Computers Teaches Us About What It Means to Be Alive by Brian Christian

English | March 1st, 2011 | ISBN: 9780385533065, 9780385533072 | 320 pages | AZW3 | 1.06 MB

The Most Human Human is a provocative, exuberant, and profound exploration of the ways in which computers are reshaping our ideas of what it means to be human. Its starting point is the annual Turing Test, which pits artificial intelligence programs against people to determine if computers can “think.”
Named for computer pioneer Alan Turing, the Turing Test convenes a panel of judges who pose questions—ranging anywhere from celebrity gossip to moral conundrums—to hidden contestants in an attempt to discern which is human and which is a computer. The machine that most often fools the panel wins the Most Human Computer Award. But there is also a prize, bizarre and intriguing, for the Most Human Human.
In 2008, the top AI program came short of passing the Turing Test by just one astonishing vote. In 2009, Brian Christian was chosen to participate, and he set out to make sure Homo sapiens would prevail.
The author’s quest to be deemed more human than a computer opens a window onto our own nature. Interweaving modern phenomena like customer service “chatbots” and men using programmed dialogue to pick up women in bars with insights from fields as diverse as chess, psychiatry, and the law, Brian Christian examines the philosophical, biological, and moral issues raised by the Turing Test.
One central definition of human has been “a being that could reason.” If computers can reason, what does that mean for the special place we reserve for humanity?

?Jon Elster, “Explaining Social Behavior: More Nuts and Bolts for the Social Sciences (2nd edition)”

2015 | ISBN-10: 1107416418, 1107071186 | 516 pages | PDF | 3 MB

In this new edition of his critically acclaimed book, Jon Elster examines the nature of social behavior, proposing choice as the central concept of the social sciences. Extensively revised throughout, the book offers an overview of key explanatory mechanisms, drawing on many case studies and experiments to explore the nature of explanation in the social sciences; an analysis of the mental states – beliefs, desires, and emotions – that are precursors to action; a systematic comparison of rational-choice models of behavior with alternative accounts, and a review of mechanisms of social interaction ranging from strategic behavior to collective decision making. A wholly new chapter includes an exploration of classical moralists and Proust in charting mental mechanisms operating ‘behind the back’ of the agent, and a new conclusion points to the pitfalls and fallacies in current ways of doing social science, proposing guidelines for more modest and more robust procedures.

?Manoush Zomorodi, “Bored and Brilliant: How Spacing Out Can Unlock Your Most Productive and Creative Self”

ASIN: B06VTZYPTF, ISBN: 1250124956, 1509869727 | 2017 | AZW3 | 208 pages | 536 KB

“Bored and Brilliant shows the fascinating side of boredom. Manoush Zomorodi investigates cutting-edge research as well as compelling (and often funny) real-life examples to demonstrate that boredom is actually a crucial tool for making our lives happier, more productive, and more creative. What’s more, the book is crammed with practical exercises for anyone who wants to reclaim the power of spacing out – deleting the Two Dots app, for instance, or having a photo-free day, or taking a ‘fakecation’.”
―Gretchen Rubin, author of #1 NYT Bestseller The Happiness Project
“Bored and Brilliant is full of easy steps to make each day more effective and every life more intentional. Manoush’s mix of personal stories, neuroscience, and data will convince you that boredom is actually a gift.”
―Charles Duhigg, author of The Power of Habit and Smarter, Faster, Better
It’s time to move “doing nothing” to the top of your to-do list.
In 2015 Manoush Zomorodi, host of WNYC’s popular podcast and radio show Note to Self, led tens of thousands of listeners through an experiment to help them unplug from their devices, get bored, jump-start their creativity, and change their lives. Bored and Brilliant builds on that experiment to show us how to rethink our gadget use to live better and smarter in this new digital ecosystem. Manoush explains the connection between boredom and original thinking, exploring how we can harness boredom’s hidden benefits to become our most productive and creative selves without totally abandoning our gadgets in the process. Grounding the book in the neuroscience and cognitive psychology of “mind wandering” what our brains do when we’re doing nothing at all―Manoush includes practical steps you can take to ease the nonstop busyness and enhance your ability to dream, wonder, and gain clarity in your work and life. The outcome is mind-blowing. Unplug and read on.

?Understanding Human Nature : The Psychology of Personality

English | 2014 | ISBN: 1851686673 | 194 Pages | ePUB/PDF(conv) | 1.72 MB

Adler’s holistic personality-based approach to psychology continues to be relevant today to students, the general public and professionals alike.
Long-regarded as the handbook of Individual Psychology, Understanding Human Nature provides an engaging introduction to Adler’s key concepts including: inferiority and superiority complexes; life style; memories and dreams; love, marriage and children; and sexuality and sexual problems. Adler’s holistic approach to the study of personality saw him challenge the dominance of Freud’s thinking (his friend and colleague) and develop a truly innovative, and still highly relevant, method of psychoanalysis. A straightforward, clearly-written book, it shows the seminal thinking of a great mind and provides a basis to understand both Adler’s unique theories and the development of twentieth-century psychology, in which his work has played such an important part.

In a Different Key The Story of Autism.epub

Bored and Brilliant How Spacing Out Can Unlock Your Most Productive and Creative Self.epub

Understanding Human Nature The Psychology of Personality.epub

The Most Human Human What Talking with Computers Teaches Us About What It Means to Be Alive.epub

Explaining Social Behavior More Nuts and Bolts for the Social Sciences, 2nd edition.pdf

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