#Philosophy_mags The Emerging Good in Plato’s Philebus by John V. Garner Internal Perception: The…

#Philosophy_mags

The Emerging Good in Plato’s Philebus by John V. Garner
Internal Perception: The Role of Bodily Information in Concepts and Word Mastery By Sara Dellantonio, Luigi Pastore
My Individualism and the Philosophical Foundations of Literature (Tuttle Classics) by Natsume Sōseki, edited by Inger Brodey, translated by Sammy I. Tsunematsu
Chrissie Astell, “Seven Steps into Angel Light: A Journey of Self-Discovery & Spiritual Empowerment”
Hegel and Spinoza: Substance and Negativity by Gregor Moder

?The Emerging Good in Plato’s Philebus by John V. Garner

English | July 15, 2017 | ISBN: 0810135590, 0810135582 | PDF | 192 pages | 2 MB

Plato’s Philebus presents a fascinating dialogue between the life of the mind and the life of pleasure. While Socrates decisively prioritizes the life of reason, he also shows that certain pleasures contribute to making the good life good. The Emerging Good in Plato’s “Philebus” argues that the Socratic pleasures of learning emphasize, above all, the importance of being open to change.
John V. Garner convincingly refines previous interpretations and uncovers a profound thesis in the Philebus: genuine learners find value not only in stable being but also in the process of becoming. Further, since genuine learning arises in pluralistic communities where people form and inform one another, those who are truly open to learning are precisely those who actively shape the betterment of humanity.
The Emerging Good in Plato’s “Philebus” thus connects the Philebus’s grand philosophical ideas about the order of values, on the one hand, to its intimate and personal account of the experience of learning, on the other. It shows that this dialogue, while agreeing broadly with themes in more widely studied works by Plato such as the Republic, Gorgias, and Phaedo, also develops a unique way of salvaging the whole of human life, including our ever-changing nature.

?Internal Perception: The Role of Bodily Information in Concepts and Word Mastery By Sara Dellantonio, Luigi Pastore

English | PDF | 2017 | 378 Pages | ISBN : 3662557614 | 3.8 MB

This book investigates how bodily information contributes to categorization processes for at least some conceptual classes and thus to the individual mastery of meanings for at least some word classes.
The bodily information considered is mainly that provided by the so-called proprioceptive and interoceptive systems introduced by Sherrington. The authors reconsider this in a new Gibsonian fashion calling it more generally “proprioception”, which indicates the complex of all the bodily signals we are aware of and the qualitative experiences these give rise to. The book shows that proprioceptive information understood in this sense is essential for explaining (among others) how we develop broad categories such as animate vs. inanimate, concepts denoting bodily experiences such as hunger or pain as well as emotions and abstract concepts such as friendship and freedom and in accounting for how we master the meanings of the corresponding words in our language.

?My Individualism and the Philosophical Foundations of Literature (Tuttle Classics) by Natsume Sōseki, edited by Inger Brodey, translated by Sammy I. Tsunematsu

English | December 20, 2011 | ISBN: 0804836035, ASIN: B0083JC2YW | AZW3 | 144 pages | 0.5 MB

Published here for the first time in English, My Individualism and The Philosophical Foundations of Literature are essays which explore issues close to famed Japanese novelist Soseki Natsume’s heart: the philosophical and cultural significance of isolation, belonging and identity associated with rapid technological, industrial and cultural change. Set against the background of the Meiji era, in which Soseki believed modern man was dislocated from Japan’s past as well as its future, he defines the role of art and the artist in light of the loneliness and individualism of the modern world.
True to his self-conscious style, each essay includes individual biographical anecdotes, inviting their allegorical reading as stories about the fate of Japan. In My Individualism, Soseki gives a rare account of his stay in London from the perspective of twelve years after his return, allowing us to see the profound shift in his thinking about literature that occurred during this time. In The Philosophical Foundations of Literature, we find one of Soseki’s principal attempts to provide a cross-cultural framework for the interpretation of literature. Together, the essays reveal Soseki’s attempts to create a theory of literature that is characteristically Japanese.

?Chrissie Astell, “Seven Steps into Angel Light: A Journey of Self-Discovery & Spiritual Empowerment”

ISBN: 1786780585 | 2017 | EPUB | 228 pages | 396.27 KB

A highly practical self-help book that draws on the universal power and energy of angels, taking readers on a seven-step journey to reconnect with themselves and live happier, more fulfilled lives.
Angels have appeared in almost every culture, faith and religion since the dawn of mankind. In this rapidly changing world of uncertainty, one thing is for sure: a universal source of guidance and love is something that we could all benefit from.
After explaining the many ways in which angel energy can be experienced and the immense value in becoming more attuned to their “light”, Chrissie takes readers through the positive qualities related to each of the seven Archangels: creating new beginnings (Gabriel); finding inspiration (Jophiel); grounding and protecting yourself (Michael); healing yourself (Raphael); learning to love yourself (Chamuel); embracing joy and transformation (Zadkiel); and feeling more at peace with yourself and the world (Uriel).
Each of the chapters…

?Hegel and Spinoza: Substance and Negativity by Gregor Moder

English | July 15th, 2017 | ISBN: 0810135426, 0810135418 | 196 pages | PDF | 1.05 MB

Gregor Moder’s Hegel and Spinoza: Substance and Negativity is a lively entry into current debates concerning Hegel, Spinoza, and their relation. Hegel and Spinoza are two of the most influential philosophers of the modern era, and the traditions of thought they inaugurated have been in continuous dialogue and conflict ever since Hegel first criticized Spinoza.
Notably, eighteenth- and nineteenth-century German Idealists aimed to overcome the determinism of Spinoza’s system by securing a place for the freedom of the subject within it, and twentieth-century French materialists such as Althusser and Deleuze rallied behind Spinoza as the ultimate champion of anti-Hegelian materialism. This conflict, or mutual rejection, lives on today in recent discussions about materialism. Contemporary thinkers either make a Hegelian case for the productiveness of concepts of the negative, nothingness, and death, or in a way that is inspired by Spinoza they abolish the concepts of the subject and negation and argue for pure affirmation and the vitalistic production of differences.
Hegel and Spinoza traces the historical roots of these alternatives and shows how contemporary discussions between Heideggerians and Althusserians, Lacanians and Deleuzians are a variation of the disagreement between Hegel and Spinoza. Throughout, Moder persuasively demonstrates that the best way to read Hegel and Spinoza is not in opposition or contrast but together: as Hegel and Spinoza.

Hegel and Spinoza Substance and Negativity.pdf

Internal Perception The Role of Bodily Information in Concepts and Word Mastery.pdf

My Individualism and the Philosophical Foundations of Literature (Tuttle Classics).epub

Seven Steps into Angel Light A Journey of Self-Discovery & Spiritual Empowerment.epub

The Emerging Good in Plato’s Philebus.pdf

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