#Philosophy_mags Party for Socialism and Liberation, Ben Becker, “Imperialism in the 21st Century: Updating…

#Philosophy_mags

Party for Socialism and Liberation, Ben Becker, “Imperialism in the 21st Century: Updating Lenin’s Theory a Century Later”
The Infidel and the Professor: David Hume, Adam Smith, and the Friendship That Shaped Modern Thought by Dennis C. Rasmussen
POWER TO SUCCEED: Why People Fail In Life And Destiny by Vukugah Emmanuel
Postmetaphysical Thinking: Between Metaphysics and the Critique of Reason by Jürgen Habermas
Michelle Klimesh, “The Story of Everything”

?Party for Socialism and Liberation, Ben Becker, “Imperialism in the 21st Century: Updating Lenin’s Theory a Century Later”

2015 | ISBN-10: 099103032X | 216 pages | PDF | 1 MB

Imperialism in the 21st Century Updating Lenin’s Theory a Century Later Over 1,000 military bases in foreign lands. Armed personnel in 130 countries. A military budget larger than the next 10 governments combined. The U.S. rulers maintain an empire, and one that is constantly at war—so much so that the White House and Pentagon now declare “endless war” to be the country’s standing military doctrine. What is the cause of this massive empire and these constant wars. How can they be stopped? Imperialism in the 21st Century revisits and updates the analysis of Russian revolutionary Vladmir Ilyich Lenin, who showed how the monopoly stage of capitalism had produced imperialist wars, and only social revolution could bring them to an end. Two world wars of unimaginable destruction confirmed Lenin’s basic thesis and also led to a complete reorganization of world politics. The rising tide of anti-colonial national liberation movements and the emergence of a powerful socialist bloc of countries after World War ll re-shaped some of the characteristic features of modern imperialism but not the organically expansionist tendency of monopoly capitalism. The dynamic of inter-imperialist rivalry for control of colonies and spheres of influence which led to World War l and World War II was replaced with a new war drive against their common enemy: socialism. The post-Cold War world order delivered unrivaled hegemony to the U.S. ruling class, who became drunk with success, but there are growing contradictions that may explode the world order once again. This publication reflects the views of the Party for Socialism and Liberation. “As the world has changed, Lenin’s core conclusion remains entirely valid that war is intrinsic to the imperialist stage of capitalism. … It underscores the bedrock necessity of anti-imperialist struggle in creating a new world based on human cooperation. A world without war!” —From Imperialism in the 21st Century

?The Infidel and the Professor: David Hume, Adam Smith, and the Friendship That Shaped Modern Thought by Dennis C. Rasmussen

English | September 12th, 2017 | ISBN: 0691177015 | 333 pages | True PDF | 73.63 MB

The story of the greatest of all philosophical friendships–and how it influenced modern thought!
David Hume is widely regarded as the most important philosopher ever to write in English, but during his lifetime he was attacked as “the Great Infidel” for his skeptical religious views and deemed unfit to teach the young. In contrast, Adam Smith was a revered professor of moral philosophy, and is now often hailed as the founding father of capitalism.
Remarkably, the two were best friends for most of their adult lives, sharing what Dennis Rasmussen calls the greatest of all philosophical friendships. The Infidel and the Professor is the first book to tell the fascinating story of the friendship of these towering Enlightenment thinkers–and how it influenced their world-changing ideas.
The book follows Hume and Smith’s relationship from their first meeting in 1749 until Hume’s death in 1776. It describes how they commented on each other’s writings, supported each other’s careers and literary ambitions, and advised each other on personal matters, most notably after Hume’s quarrel with Jean-Jacques Rousseau.
Members of a vibrant intellectual scene in Enlightenment Scotland, Hume and Smith made many of the same friends (and enemies), joined the same clubs, and were interested in many of the same subjects well beyond philosophy and economics–from psychology and history to politics and Britain’s conflict with the American colonies. The book reveals that Smith’s private religious views were considerably closer to Hume’s public ones than is usually believed. It also shows that Hume contributed more to economics–and Smith contributed more to philosophy–than is generally recognized.
Vividly written, The Infidel and the Professor is a compelling account of a great friendship that had great consequences for modern thought.

?POWER TO SUCCEED: Why People Fail In Life And Destiny by Vukugah Emmanuel

English | August 30, 2017 | ASIN: B07591WCZ4 | 26 Pages | PDF | 1 MB

Many dreams, ambitions and destinies have ended at the doorstep of fear. The fear of failure has killed dreams and paralyzed many dreamers who had talents and potential. The way to kill fear is to realize that fear is simply a mental construction of a possible outcome. It is in your mind, it is not real.
Man as specie has evolved and keeps evolving just as the world around him has undergone its fair share of change. Despite man’s continuous metamorphosis, one thing that has remained constant is his quest for success. Every human being on the face of the earth is genetically programmed to desire to be successful at one thing or the other. While there are some who end up achieving their aims and goals, majority of men suffer defeat not because they did not try, but mainly because they were uninformed. “Power to succeed” is a guide to the silent and fearful dreamer. Learning why others fail is a way to guard against failing. You are only as successful as the things you know.

?Postmetaphysical Thinking: Between Metaphysics and the Critique of Reason by Jürgen Habermas

English | October 6th, 2015 | ASIN: B016BNH4EE, ISBN: 9780745607344 | 264 pages | AZW3 | 0.37 MB

In this new collection of recent essays, Habermas takes up and pursues the line of analysis begun in The Philosophical Discourse of Modernity. He begins by outlining the sources and central themes of twentieth-century philosophy, and the range of current debates. He then examines a number of key contributions to these debates, from the pragmatic philosophies of Mead, Perice and Rorty to the post-structuralism of Foucault.
Like most contemporary thinkers, Habermas is critical of the Western metaphysical tradition and its exaggerated conception of reason. But he cautions against the temptation to relinquish this conception altogether. In opposition to the radical critics of Western philosophy, Habermas argues that postmetaphysical thinking can remain critical only if it preserves the idea of reason while stripping it of its metaphysical trappings. Habermas contributes to this task by developing further his distinctive approach to problems of meaning, rationality and subjectivity.
This book will be of particular interest to students of philosophy, sociology and social and political theory, and it will be essential reading for anyone interested in the continuing development of Habermas’s project.

?Michelle Klimesh, “The Story of Everything”

2005 | pages: 276 | ISBN: 0966670590 | PDF | 1,8 mb

The Urantia Book describes the nature of God, the structure of the universe, the heirarchy of angels, life after death, life on other planets, mankind’s origin and destiny, evolution, the history of our planet, and the life and teachings of Jesus. For those who seek a summary of these teachings, The Story of Everything distills them into a compact volume that retains the vast scope of the original while omitting much of the detail.

Imperialism in the 21st Century Updating Lenin’s Theory a Century Later.pdf

POWER TO SUCCEED Why People Fail In Life And Destiny.pdf

The Infidel and the Professor David Hume, Adam Smith, and the Friendship That Shaped Modern Thought.pdf

Postmetaphysical Thinking Between Metaphysics and the Critique of Reason.epub

The Story of Everything.pdf

Leave a Comment